Explosion of Chicago’s Black Street Gangs - 1900 to Present, by Useni Eugene Perkins, Third World Press, Chicago, 1987. I picked up a copy of this rather slender book (considering its subject) at an estate sale this morning, from the home of the late Johnie T. McDonald. This copy is inscribed to McDonald by the author.

Explosion of Chicago’s Black Street Gangs - 1900 to Present, by Useni Eugene Perkins, Third World Press, Chicago, 1987. I picked up a copy of this rather slender book (considering its subject) at an estate sale this morning, from the home of the late Johnie T. McDonald. This copy is inscribed to McDonald by the author.

I’ll be moderating what is sure to be a great evening of discussion and live music tomorrow (3/29) at Intuit in Chicago. I hope you’ll join me. The event is free and free copies of the latest Public Collectors publication about Malachi Ritscher will also be available at the event. Details:
A panel discussion and concert investigating the influence ofthe MALACHI RITSCHER COLLECTION
curated & moderated by MARC FISCHER with panelists TEMPESTT HAZEL, PETER MARGASAK, & MICHAEL ZERANG and a live performance by JAMES BAKER, JAMES BECKER, JIM DORLING, & MICHAEL ZERANG
This discussion and performance will investigate the influence of Malachi Ritscher—the late Chicago-based documentarian, activist, artist, musician, photographer, and supporter of experimental and improvised music whose thousands of audio recordings fill the shelves of the Creative Audio Archive at Experimental Sound Studio.
Marc Fischer, Administrator of the initiative Public Collectors whose project for the 2014 Whitney Biennial focuses on Malachi Ritscher, will moderate a discussion alongside independent curator, writer and executive director Tempestt Hazel of Sixty Inches From Center, Peter Margasak—a longtime music writer for the Chicago Reader, and musician, composer and producer Michael Zerang who has curated and presented hundreds of events at Links Hall, Cafe Urbus Orbis and his own space The Candlestick Maker, which existed in Chicago’s Albany Park neighborhood from 2001-2005.
Following the discussion, there will be a musical performance by Jim Baker, Jim Becker, Jim Dorling, and Michael Zerang. It is worth noting that Jim Dorling will perform using an Indian harmonium that was once owned by Ritscher and was recently recovered from a Chicago consignment shop with the kind permission and assistance of Malachi’s parents Dick and Betty Ann Ritscher.
SATURDAY MARCH 29TH, 7PMINTUIT: THE CENTER FOR INTUITIVE & OUTSIDER ART756 N Milwaukee Ave.FREE ADMISSION
About the Malachi Ritscher CollectionThe Malachi Ritscher Collection represents the work of Chicago sound recordist Malachi Ritscher. Ritscher was a passionate supporter of Chicago’s improvised music jazz scene. Although technically an amateur, Mr. Ritscher was well known in Chicago for making meticulous, high fidelity recordings at hundreds of live music events from the mid-1980s (perhaps earlier) until his death in 2006. This collection of recordings, now a part of the Creative Audio Archive, is a unique record of musical development in Chicago during a particularly fertile period, a history that resonates to the present.
About the Creative Audio ArchiveThe Creative Audio Archive (CAA) is a Chicago-based center for the preservation and investigation of innovative and experimental sonic arts and music. The CAA was formed in response to growing concerns over the general state of historical preservation of non-mainstream audio, in particular, recordings, print, and visual ephemera related to avant-garde and exploratory sound and music of the last five decades. The CAA was therefore conceived as a center to safeguard volatile materials, to transfer them to accessible and stable media, to catalogue and cross-reference these materials, and to make them accessible for study and, where feasible, to present them to the public at large. The CAA comprises a number of distinct collections, including the Sun Ra/El Saturn Collection, the ESS Collection, the Links Hall Collection, and the (a)R(t) Noise/Necessary Art Collection.

I’ll be moderating what is sure to be a great evening of discussion and live music tomorrow (3/29) at Intuit in Chicago. I hope you’ll join me. The event is free and free copies of the latest Public Collectors publication about Malachi Ritscher will also be available at the event. Details:

A panel discussion and concert investigating the influence of
the MALACHI RITSCHER COLLECTION

curated & moderated by MARC FISCHER with panelists TEMPESTT HAZEL, PETER MARGASAK, & MICHAEL ZERANG and a live performance by JAMES BAKER, JAMES BECKER, JIM DORLING, & MICHAEL ZERANG

This discussion and performance will investigate the influence of Malachi Ritscher—the late Chicago-based documentarian, activist, artist, musician, photographer, and supporter of experimental and improvised music whose thousands of audio recordings fill the shelves of the Creative Audio Archive at Experimental Sound Studio.

Marc Fischer, Administrator of the initiative Public Collectors whose project for the 2014 Whitney Biennial focuses on Malachi Ritscher, will moderate a discussion alongside independent curator, writer and executive director Tempestt Hazel of Sixty Inches From Center, Peter Margasak—a longtime music writer for the Chicago Reader, and musician, composer and producer Michael Zerang who has curated and presented hundreds of events at Links Hall, Cafe Urbus Orbis and his own space The Candlestick Maker, which existed in Chicago’s Albany Park neighborhood from 2001-2005.

Following the discussion, there will be a musical performance by Jim Baker, Jim Becker, Jim Dorling, and Michael Zerang. It is worth noting that Jim Dorling will perform using an Indian harmonium that was once owned by Ritscher and was recently recovered from a Chicago consignment shop with the kind permission and assistance of Malachi’s parents Dick and Betty Ann Ritscher.

SATURDAY MARCH 29TH, 7PM
INTUIT: THE CENTER FOR INTUITIVE & OUTSIDER ART
756 N Milwaukee Ave.
FREE ADMISSION

About the Malachi Ritscher Collection
The Malachi Ritscher Collection represents the work of Chicago sound recordist Malachi Ritscher. Ritscher was a passionate supporter of Chicago’s improvised music jazz scene. Although technically an amateur, Mr. Ritscher was well known in Chicago for making meticulous, high fidelity recordings at hundreds of live music events from the mid-1980s (perhaps earlier) until his death in 2006. This collection of recordings, now a part of the Creative Audio Archive, is a unique record of musical development in Chicago during a particularly fertile period, a history that resonates to the present.

About the Creative Audio Archive
The Creative Audio Archive (CAA) is a Chicago-based center for the preservation and investigation of innovative and experimental sonic arts and music. The CAA was formed in response to growing concerns over the general state of historical preservation of non-mainstream audio, in particular, recordings, print, and visual ephemera related to avant-garde and exploratory sound and music of the last five decades. The CAA was therefore conceived as a center to safeguard volatile materials, to transfer them to accessible and stable media, to catalogue and cross-reference these materials, and to make them accessible for study and, where feasible, to present them to the public at large. The CAA comprises a number of distinct collections, including the Sun Ra/El Saturn Collection, the ESS Collection, the Links Hall Collection, and the (a)R(t) Noise/Necessary Art Collection.

Raw Deal (before they were forced to change their name to Killing Time) at the Frankford Y in Philadelphia in 1988. Photo by Marc Fischer.

Raw Deal (before they were forced to change their name to Killing Time) at the Frankford Y in Philadelphia in 1988. Photo by Marc Fischer.

Chuck Treece in the band McRad, from a concert at a VFW hall in or near Philadelphia. The stamp on the back of the photo says June 1988 so while I’m not positive of when this show happened, it’s around that time. Dare to Defy also played that night. Photo by Marc Fischer.

Chuck Treece in the band McRad, from a concert at a VFW hall in or near Philadelphia. The stamp on the back of the photo says June 1988 so while I’m not positive of when this show happened, it’s around that time. Dare to Defy also played that night. Photo by Marc Fischer.

Jello Biafra, after a spoken word performance in Philadelphia. I believe this is from Drexel University in 1988. Photograph by Marc Fischer.

Jello Biafra, after a spoken word performance in Philadelphia. I believe this is from Drexel University in 1988. Photograph by Marc Fischer.

Jello Biafra, after a spoken word performance in Philadelphia. I believe this is from Drexel University in 1988. Photograph by Marc Fischer.

Jello Biafra, after a spoken word performance in Philadelphia. I believe this is from Drexel University in 1988. Photograph by Marc Fischer.

A detail from an album cover for The Band of the Air Force Reserve Jazz Ensemble, based in Georgia. Undated but circa early 1980s. A find from a thrift store I stopped at on the way home from Green Bay, Wisconsin yesterday.

A detail from an album cover for The Band of the Air Force Reserve Jazz Ensemble, based in Georgia. Undated but circa early 1980s. A find from a thrift store I stopped at on the way home from Green Bay, Wisconsin yesterday.

Yesterday I drove to Green Bay to view the exhibit “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger”, curated by Stephen Perkins and currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.
The centerpiece of this show is a 600 foot long scroll that Rininger worked on for a year. The scroll, which must be cranked across a very long table by two people, is filled with stunning color and black and white image transfers as well as spray paint stencils - many dealing with Rininger’s biography, hospitalization and mortality. Yesterday Stephen and I viewed about a hundred feet of it, and the piece is amazing. It’s also impossible to photograph in any normal sort of way but I took a few details. Here is one. Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

Yesterday I drove to Green Bay to view the exhibit “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger”, curated by Stephen Perkins and currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

The centerpiece of this show is a 600 foot long scroll that Rininger worked on for a year. The scroll, which must be cranked across a very long table by two people, is filled with stunning color and black and white image transfers as well as spray paint stencils - many dealing with Rininger’s biography, hospitalization and mortality. Yesterday Stephen and I viewed about a hundred feet of it, and the piece is amazing. It’s also impossible to photograph in any normal sort of way but I took a few details. Here is one.

Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

Yesterday I drove to Green Bay to view the exhibit “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger”, curated by Stephen Perkins and currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.
The centerpiece of this show is a 600 foot long scroll that Rininger worked on for a year. The scroll, which must be cranked across a very long table by two people, is filled with stunning color and black and white image transfers as well as spray paint stencils - many dealing with Rininger’s biography, hospitalization and mortality. Yesterday Stephen and I viewed about a hundred feet of it, and the piece is amazing. It’s also impossible to photograph in any normal sort of way but I took a few details. Here is one. Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

Yesterday I drove to Green Bay to view the exhibit “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger”, curated by Stephen Perkins and currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

The centerpiece of this show is a 600 foot long scroll that Rininger worked on for a year. The scroll, which must be cranked across a very long table by two people, is filled with stunning color and black and white image transfers as well as spray paint stencils - many dealing with Rininger’s biography, hospitalization and mortality. Yesterday Stephen and I viewed about a hundred feet of it, and the piece is amazing. It’s also impossible to photograph in any normal sort of way but I took a few details. Here is one.

Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

Yesterday I drove to Green Bay to view the exhibit “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger”, curated by Stephen Perkins and currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.
The centerpiece of this show is a 600 foot long scroll that Rininger worked on for a year. The scroll, which must be cranked across a very long table by two people, is filled with stunning color and black and white image transfers as well as spray paint stencils - many dealing with Rininger’s biography, hospitalization and mortality. Yesterday Stephen and I viewed about a hundred feet of it, and the piece is amazing. It’s also impossible to photograph in any normal sort of way but I took a few details. Here is one. Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

Yesterday I drove to Green Bay to view the exhibit “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger”, curated by Stephen Perkins and currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

The centerpiece of this show is a 600 foot long scroll that Rininger worked on for a year. The scroll, which must be cranked across a very long table by two people, is filled with stunning color and black and white image transfers as well as spray paint stencils - many dealing with Rininger’s biography, hospitalization and mortality. Yesterday Stephen and I viewed about a hundred feet of it, and the piece is amazing. It’s also impossible to photograph in any normal sort of way but I took a few details. Here is one.

Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

The exhibition guide/essay for “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger” by Stephen Perkins from a show currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. I’m driving up to see this exhibit tomorrow and am excited for this very rare opportunity to view a full presentation of Rininger’s work. Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

The exhibition guide/essay for “The Heart is Mostly Made of Water: John Rininger” by Stephen Perkins from a show currently on view at Lawton Gallery at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. I’m driving up to see this exhibit tomorrow and am excited for this very rare opportunity to view a full presentation of Rininger’s work. Public Collectors loaned a collection of 179 pieces of ephemera that once belonged to John Rininger for this show. You can see complete scans of that material here.

Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing).

Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing).

Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing).

Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing).

Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing). More posts from this book to follow.

Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing). More posts from this book to follow.

A page, used as a coloring book, from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing). Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki. More posts from this book to follow.

A page, used as a coloring book, from an English lesson book for Polish speakers, published by Felician Sisters, Chicago, Illinois, 1952 (second printing). Illustrations by Siostry Felicjanki. More posts from this book to follow.