Ransacked - Aunt Ethel: An Ending, a 1980 artist book by Nancy Holt, published by Printed Matter who describe this book as follows: “Photos and text are combined in a tragic account of the last days in the life of an elderly woman - the artist’s aunt - who is robbed and abused by her housekeeper. A disturbing look at a type of victimization that has received little attention.” This post is a Public Collectors Request Line fulfillment for my wife Jen (not on Tumblr) who just shouted down to me, “Post more stuff by women! More domestic stuff!”

Ransacked - Aunt Ethel: An Ending, a 1980 artist book by Nancy Holt, published by Printed Matter who describe this book as follows: “Photos and text are combined in a tragic account of the last days in the life of an elderly woman - the artist’s aunt - who is robbed and abused by her housekeeper. A disturbing look at a type of victimization that has received little attention.”

This post is a Public Collectors Request Line fulfillment for my wife Jen (not on Tumblr) who just shouted down to me, “Post more stuff by women! More domestic stuff!”

Honesty Is Still In Style, a 2012 artist book by the Australia-based artist Keg de Souza. See more of her work here.

Honesty Is Still In Style, a 2012 artist book by the Australia-based artist Keg de Souza. See more of her work here.

Hati-Hati, a 2012 artist book by the Australia-based artist Keg de Souza. See more of her work here.

Hati-Hati, a 2012 artist book by the Australia-based artist Keg de Souza. See more of her work here.

The Manhattan Telephone Book 1972 by Bern Porter, Abyss Publications, Somerville, Mass., 1975. 

The Manhattan Telephone Book 1972 by Bern Porter, Abyss Publications, Somerville, Mass., 1975. 

Normally I reserve this blog for Public Collectors news, but it’s a happy day when the group I’m part of, Temporary Services, releases a new book. Please support, and because I fill the mail orders for Half Letter Press, if you mention in your order that you saw this on Public Collectors, I’ll throw in some free stuff! 
halfletterpress:
New from Half Letter Press: Mobile Phenomena by Temporary Services!Mobile Phenomena is a new collection of over eighty-five photographs and short interviews. It is the result of years of research on common instances of mobile phenomena that impact people and their uses of shared city and rural spaces. In this book you will find bookmobiles, mobile forms of commerce, inventive mobile art projects, mobile structures created for use during protest, and some strange applications of mobility that defy easy description, categorization, or whose function could not be readily discerned. Mobile Phenomena can unhinge the expected roles we take in shared city spaces. Mobile structures can become a new norm when they work. It is our hope that this book can be an inspiration to other citizens, artists, activists, nomads, and anyone who is interested in escaping the constraints of their location, culture, or other factors that make realizing oneʼs desires difficult. Mobile Phenomena includes contributions by: Courtney Dailey, Alexis Petroff, Joseph Robertson, Jen Hofer, Eric Steen, Christian Ettinger, Platform, Liberate Tate, The Center For Tactical Magic, and Nils Norman.
The book is now available for order. Please help us spread the word, and note some great special deals we have going on!

Normally I reserve this blog for Public Collectors news, but it’s a happy day when the group I’m part of, Temporary Services, releases a new book. Please support, and because I fill the mail orders for Half Letter Press, if you mention in your order that you saw this on Public Collectors, I’ll throw in some free stuff!

halfletterpress:

New from Half Letter Press: Mobile Phenomena by Temporary Services!

Mobile Phenomena is a new collection of over eighty-five photographs and short interviews. It is the result of years of research on common instances of mobile phenomena that impact people and their uses of shared city and rural spaces. In this book you will find bookmobiles, mobile forms of commerce, inventive mobile art projects, mobile structures created for use during protest, and some strange applications of mobility that defy easy description, categorization, or whose function could not be readily discerned. Mobile Phenomena can unhinge the expected roles we take in shared city spaces. Mobile structures can become a new norm when they work. It is our hope that this book can be an inspiration to other citizens, artists, activists, nomads, and anyone who is interested in escaping the constraints of their location, culture, or other factors that make realizing oneʼs desires difficult.

Mobile Phenomena includes contributions by: Courtney Dailey, Alexis Petroff, Joseph Robertson, Jen Hofer, Eric Steen, Christian Ettinger, Platform, Liberate Tate, The Center For Tactical Magic, and Nils Norman.

The book is now available for order. Please help us spread the word, and note some great special deals we have going on!

From the new book published by Half Letter Press: Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten.
“Attica: The Struggle Continues” by the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (Laura Whitehorn lead designer), NYC, 1979-1980.
Don’t forget their contest! Reblog this post for a chance to win a signed copy of this book.

From the new book published by Half Letter Press: Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten.

“Attica: The Struggle Continues” by the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (Laura Whitehorn lead designer), NYC, 1979-1980.

Don’t forget their contest! Reblog this post for a chance to win a signed copy of this book.

New Public Collectors publication and event alert! Just finished: UNDERGROUND MUSIC ‘ZINES from the late 1980s - early 90s. Buy a copy here from Half Letter Press or pick one up for free in Chicago on Saturday or Sunday, August 6 & 7, 2011 at The STOREFRONT on 2606 N. California. From 12-5 PM each day you’ll be able to read around 200 ‘zines from this period, while listening to over 200 cassettes of the music they feature. It would be great to meet some of you. Please spread the word. 

New Public Collectors publication and event alert! Just finished: UNDERGROUND MUSIC ‘ZINES from the late 1980s - early 90s. Buy a copy here from Half Letter Press or pick one up for free in Chicago on Saturday or Sunday, August 6 & 7, 2011 at The STOREFRONT on 2606 N. California. From 12-5 PM each day you’ll be able to read around 200 ‘zines from this period, while listening to over 200 cassettes of the music they feature. It would be great to meet some of you. Please spread the word. 

Scanned from Diccionario De Albures Ilustrado by Carlos Chávez, Gómez Gómez Hnos. Editores, Mexico, D.F., 2000.

Scanned from Diccionario De Albures Ilustrado by Carlos Chávez, Gómez Gómez Hnos. Editores, Mexico, D.F., 2000.

Scanned from Diccionario De Albures Ilustrado cby Carlos Chávez, Gómez Gómez Hnos. Editores, Mexico, D.F., 2000.

Scanned from Diccionario De Albures Ilustrado cby Carlos Chávez, Gómez Gómez Hnos. Editores, Mexico, D.F., 2000.

Diccionario De Albures Ilustrado by Carlos Chávez, Gómez Gómez Hnos. Editores, Mexico, D.F., 2000.
I’m guessing this is not by the same Carlos Chávez that was a Mexican composer. This subversive alphabet book looks like a children’s book from the cover but the inside is filled with coloring book style line drawings of sex-crazed animals getting into all sorts of alcohol-fueled debauchery. Scans of a couple interior pages to follow. 

Diccionario De Albures Ilustrado by Carlos Chávez, Gómez Gómez Hnos. Editores, Mexico, D.F., 2000.

I’m guessing this is not by the same Carlos Chávez that was a Mexican composer. This subversive alphabet book looks like a children’s book from the cover but the inside is filled with coloring book style line drawings of sex-crazed animals getting into all sorts of alcohol-fueled debauchery. Scans of a couple interior pages to follow. 

The front cover of Crocodile Tears by Douglas Huebler, published by the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, 1986. I intend to scan this entire publication when I have more time but for now the cover will have to do.

The front cover of Crocodile Tears by Douglas Huebler, published by the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, 1986. I intend to scan this entire publication when I have more time but for now the cover will have to do.

10 notes

A sweet used book store score: Damn Everything But the Circus, by Corita Kent from 1970 (after she stopped calling herself a Sister). This is essentially an alphabet book, mixed with quotes on one side of each spread and vibrant collage-style prints that fill the opposite pages. It’s too big for the scanner bed unfortunately so this photo of the cover will have to suffice for now.

A sweet used book store score: Damn Everything But the Circus, by Corita Kent from 1970 (after she stopped calling herself a Sister). This is essentially an alphabet book, mixed with quotes on one side of each spread and vibrant collage-style prints that fill the opposite pages. It’s too big for the scanner bed unfortunately so this photo of the cover will have to suffice for now.

2 notes

The front cover of Flip-Flop Prophets, a 2008 silk-screened artist book by Owen Plummer, published by French crazoids Le Dernier Cri.

The front cover of Flip-Flop Prophets, a 2008 silk-screened artist book by Owen Plummer, published by French crazoids Le Dernier Cri.

Greetings from snow-covered Chicago. Despite all the white stuff, this week will be the last opportunity to check out Don Celender: 11 Books, at Public Collectors Study Center. I have added a second day of hours for those who might be immobilized on Wednesday. Final viewing hours are:Wednesday, February 10, 5-8 PMFriday, February 12, 1-4 PM Hours end sharply at 8 PM and 4 PM on both nights so please arrive to allow enough time for your visit. About Don Celender:When Don Celender died in 2005, he left behind an unusually focused and accessible body of work that is ripe for rediscovery. Many younger audiences and those who did not see his solo exhibitions (almost all presented in New York), or have yet to encounter his books (mostly self-published and hard to find) are unfamiliar with this underrated Conceptual artist.Celender lived most of his life in St. Paul, Minnesota where he taught Art History and chaired the Art department at Macalester College for over forty years. Celender’s books and exhibits most frequently took the form of collected results from surveys. These surveys, often printed on official Macalester College stationary, were primarily conducted through the mail. Despite a great deal of writing about social practices and participatory artworks in recent years, mentions of Don Celender’s many survey projects, all dependent on the voices and participation of others, are absent from this critical discourse. Rather than taking his Ph.D. and retreating into the most obscure recesses of research and academia, Celender often used his deep knowledge of art history and his concern with art’s place in society to create a playful and humorous engagement with art and culture that could be accessible to a broad range of readers. This is the first survey of Celender’s work to be presented in Chicago.Visitors to the exhibit will be able to pick up a free limited edition folio with materials on Celender published by Public Collectors.
Address information and other details here.

Greetings from snow-covered Chicago.

Despite all the white stuff, this week will be the last opportunity to check out Don Celender: 11 Books, at Public Collectors Study Center.

I have added a second day of hours for those who might be immobilized on Wednesday.

Final viewing hours are:

Wednesday, February 10, 5-8 PM
Friday, February 12, 1-4 PM
Hours end sharply at 8 PM and 4 PM on both nights so please arrive to allow enough time for your visit.

About Don Celender:

When Don Celender died in 2005, he left behind an unusually focused and accessible body of work that is ripe for rediscovery. Many younger audiences and those who did not see his solo exhibitions (almost all presented in New York), or have yet to encounter his books (mostly self-published and hard to find) are unfamiliar with this underrated Conceptual artist.

Celender lived most of his life in St. Paul, Minnesota where he taught Art History and chaired the Art department at Macalester College for over forty years. Celender’s books and exhibits most frequently took the form of collected results from surveys. These surveys, often printed on official Macalester College stationary, were primarily conducted through the mail. Despite a great deal of writing about social practices and participatory artworks in recent years, mentions of Don Celender’s many survey projects, all dependent on the voices and participation of others, are absent from this critical discourse. Rather than taking his Ph.D. and retreating into the most obscure recesses of research and academia, Celender often used his deep knowledge of art history and his concern with art’s place in society to create a playful and humorous engagement with art and culture that could be accessible to a broad range of readers. This is the first survey of Celender’s work to be presented in Chicago.

Visitors to the exhibit will be able to pick up a free limited edition folio with materials on Celender published by Public Collectors.

Address information and other details here.

A collection of X’s, from the cover of a 2009 book that I believe is just titled X. X was edited and designed by Glen Cummings and Adam Michaels. The introduction: “This publication is an initial attempt to examine the trajectory of the X symbol in underground music culture. While the X is broadly associated with the Punk scene – in particular, straight edge hardcore – the symbol contains a wide range of often-contradictory meanings. This document presents our ongoing research; we welcome comments, corrections, and criticisms.”

A collection of X’s, from the cover of a 2009 book that I believe is just titled X. X was edited and designed by Glen Cummings and Adam Michaels. The introduction: “This publication is an initial attempt to examine the trajectory of the X symbol in underground music culture. While the X is broadly associated with the Punk scene – in particular, straight edge hardcore – the symbol contains a wide range of often-contradictory meanings. This document presents our ongoing research; we welcome comments, corrections, and criticisms.”