A drawing by Paul R. Allison mailed to me in April 1993. At the time that he sent this, Paul was in prison in Amarillo, Texas.

A drawing by Paul R. Allison mailed to me in April 1993. At the time that he sent this, Paul was in prison in Amarillo, Texas.

The front cover of the book Instead of Prisons - A Handbook for Abolitionists, published by the Prison Research Education Action Project, Syracuse, NY, 1976. Thanks to Prionace who found a digital version of the text from this book here.

The front cover of the book Instead of Prisons - A Handbook for Abolitionists, published by the Prison Research Education Action Project, Syracuse, NY, 1976. Thanks to Prionace who found a digital version of the text from this book here.

Killing Time: Life in the Arkansas Penitentiary by Bruce Jackson, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, 1977.

Killing Time: Life in the Arkansas Penitentiary by Bruce Jackson, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, 1977.

Killing Time: Life in the Arkansas Penitentiary by Bruce Jackson, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, 1977. I’m really happy to have found a copy of this book today. As an undergrad, I was a visiting artist at Western Penitentiary in Pittsburgh (no longer open) and during that time I was particularly obsessed with this book. I’m sure I checked it out of the library at Carnegie Mellon at least several times. Killing Time remains a powerful look at prison life with many keenly observed and haunting photos.

Killing Time: Life in the Arkansas Penitentiary by Bruce Jackson, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, 1977. I’m really happy to have found a copy of this book today. As an undergrad, I was a visiting artist at Western Penitentiary in Pittsburgh (no longer open) and during that time I was particularly obsessed with this book. I’m sure I checked it out of the library at Carnegie Mellon at least several times. Killing Time remains a powerful look at prison life with many keenly observed and haunting photos.

Scanned from The Messenger, Fall Issue, 1976. The Messenger was a quarterly periodical published by and  for   the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South    Dakota, with the permission of the warden. More posts about this publication, including a link to download a PDF of the Summer 1972 issue, here.

Scanned from The Messenger, Fall Issue, 1976. The Messenger was a quarterly periodical published by and for the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, with the permission of the warden. More posts about this publication, including a link to download a PDF of the Summer 1972 issue, here.

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"Doin’ Cell Time" - a column by Thomas E. Skolimowski scanned from The Messenger, Summer 1972.
The Messenger was a quarterly periodical published by and  for  the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South   Dakota, with the permission of the warden. “The purpose of this  magazine  is to give the inmates an opportunity for self expression, to  provide  them a medium of discussion of public problems, to foster  better  understanding between inmates and the general public, and to be   constructively informative.” Click here to download a 75.2 mb PDF of this entire issue of The Messenger.

"Doin’ Cell Time" - a column by Thomas E. Skolimowski scanned from The Messenger, Summer 1972.

The Messenger was a quarterly periodical published by and for the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, with the permission of the warden. “The purpose of this magazine is to give the inmates an opportunity for self expression, to provide them a medium of discussion of public problems, to foster better understanding between inmates and the general public, and to be constructively informative.” Click here to download a 75.2 mb PDF of this entire issue of The Messenger.

A new PDF is available for download in the Public Collectors PDF collection.
The Messenger, Summer 1972, Vol. 57, No. 2, Sioux City Falls, South Dakota.
The Messenger was a quarterly periodical published by and for  the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South  Dakota, with the permission of the warden. “The purpose of this magazine  is to give the inmates an opportunity for self expression, to provide  them a medium of discussion of public problems, to foster better  understanding between inmates and the general public, and to be  constructively informative.”
Click here to download this 75.2 mb file.

A new PDF is available for download in the Public Collectors PDF collection.

The Messenger, Summer 1972, Vol. 57, No. 2, Sioux City Falls, South Dakota.

The Messenger was a quarterly periodical published by and for the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, with the permission of the warden. “The purpose of this magazine is to give the inmates an opportunity for self expression, to provide them a medium of discussion of public problems, to foster better understanding between inmates and the general public, and to be constructively informative.”

Click here to download this 75.2 mb file.

An uncredited work of art from the Summer 1972 issue of The Messenger. The Messenger was published by and for the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, with the permission of the warden. “The purpose of this magazine is to give the inmates an opportunity for self expression, to provide them a medium of discussion of public problems, to foster better understanding between inmates and the general public, and to be constructively informative.”
If anyone has other issues of this magazine, please get in touch with me: marc [at] publiccollectors.org

An uncredited work of art from the Summer 1972 issue of The Messenger. The Messenger was published by and for the men of the South Dakota State Penitentiary, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, with the permission of the warden. “The purpose of this magazine is to give the inmates an opportunity for self expression, to provide them a medium of discussion of public problems, to foster better understanding between inmates and the general public, and to be constructively informative.”

If anyone has other issues of this magazine, please get in touch with me: marc [at] publiccollectors.org

From the new book published by Half Letter Press: Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten.
“Attica: The Struggle Continues” by the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (Laura Whitehorn lead designer), NYC, 1979-1980.
Don’t forget their contest! Reblog this post for a chance to win a signed copy of this book.

From the new book published by Half Letter Press: Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten.

“Attica: The Struggle Continues” by the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (Laura Whitehorn lead designer), NYC, 1979-1980.

Don’t forget their contest! Reblog this post for a chance to win a signed copy of this book.

(Source: halfletterpress)

A clear plastic radio from the Spring 2011 Walkenhorst’s California  Catalog. Walkenhorst’s is a company that sells items that can be ordered  for prisoners by inmates or their loved ones. Clear plastic products  are designed to prevent the concealment of contraband inside their  casing.

A clear plastic radio from the Spring 2011 Walkenhorst’s California Catalog. Walkenhorst’s is a company that sells items that can be ordered for prisoners by inmates or their loved ones. Clear plastic products are designed to prevent the concealment of contraband inside their casing.

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A clear plastic typewriter from the Spring 2011 Walkenhorst’s California  Catalog. Walkenhorst’s is a company that sells items that can be ordered  for prisoners by inmates or their loved ones. Clear plastic products  are designed to prevent the concealment of contraband inside their  casing.

A clear plastic typewriter from the Spring 2011 Walkenhorst’s California Catalog. Walkenhorst’s is a company that sells items that can be ordered for prisoners by inmates or their loved ones. Clear plastic products are designed to prevent the concealment of contraband inside their casing.

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A drawing by Angelo from 2004 titled The Cool Kids. Ballpoint pen on 8.5” X 11” paper. More about Angelo and many examples of his work can be found here.

A drawing by Angelo from 2004 titled The Cool Kids. Ballpoint pen on 8.5” X 11” paper. More about Angelo and many examples of his work can be found here.

A drawing by Angelo titled Passing Through from 2003. Ballpoint pen on 8.5” X 11” paper. More about Angelo and many examples of his work can be found here, including ten more drawings scanned this evening.

A drawing by Angelo titled Passing Through from 2003. Ballpoint pen on 8.5” X 11” paper. More about Angelo and many examples of his work can be found here, including ten more drawings scanned this evening.

An untitled drawing of a cyclops by Angelo, an artist who remains incarcerated in California until next month when he should finally be released. This 1991 drawing, like most of his work, is ballpoint pen on a letter-size sheet of paper. You can see more drawings by Angelo here.

An untitled drawing of a cyclops by Angelo, an artist who remains incarcerated in California until next month when he should finally be released. This 1991 drawing, like most of his work, is ballpoint pen on a letter-size sheet of paper. You can see more drawings by Angelo here.

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A ballpoint pen drawing from 1998 by Angelo titled Crowd Control. Many people have seen Angelo’s drawings as part of the ongoing project Prisoners’ Inventions. Prisoners’ Inventions is a collaboration between Angelo and the group Temporary Services,   (I am a member of this group). The vast majority of Angelo’s art   production is more fantasy-oriented, or steeped in history and his   imagination. Most of Angelo’s drawings, including this one, are simply   ballpoint pen on 8.5 X 11” paper.
This month, after over two decades in prison, Angelo is going to  be   released. I’ll be scanning more of the drawings he has made in  prison,   which he has been sending me for safe keeping, in an effort to  better   circulate his amazing work. You can see additional drawings like  this   on this Flickr page.

A ballpoint pen drawing from 1998 by Angelo titled Crowd Control. Many people have seen Angelo’s drawings as part of the ongoing project Prisoners’ Inventions. Prisoners’ Inventions is a collaboration between Angelo and the group Temporary Services, (I am a member of this group). The vast majority of Angelo’s art production is more fantasy-oriented, or steeped in history and his imagination. Most of Angelo’s drawings, including this one, are simply ballpoint pen on 8.5 X 11” paper.

This month, after over two decades in prison, Angelo is going to be released. I’ll be scanning more of the drawings he has made in prison, which he has been sending me for safe keeping, in an effort to better circulate his amazing work. You can see additional drawings like this on this Flickr page.

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